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Nikon Australia announces development of AF-S NIKKOR 500mm f/5.6E PF ED VR

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Nikon Australia is pleased to announce the development of the AF-S NIKKOR 500mm f/5.6E PF ED VR, a fixed focal length super-telephoto lens compatible with Nikon FX-format digital SLR cameras that offers superior agility and optical performance.

The AF-S NIKKOR 500mm f/5.6E PF ED VR will be a high-performance super-telephoto lens that is significantly smaller and lighter than comparable predecessors due to the adoption of Phase Fresnel (PF) lens element used in the AF-S NIKKOR 300mm f/4E PF ED VR, released in January 2015. This makes hand-held photography easy, despite it being a fixed focal length super-telephoto lens that supports 500mm focal length. The portability of the lens allows it to be used in a wider variety of situations, and for capturing fast-moving and unpredictable subjects, making it the perfect choice for sport and wildlife photography.

Details, including the release date and suggested retail price for this product, will be shared at a later date.

Nikon continues to encourage the pursuit of imaging expression possibilities through its innovative products and solutions, built on its 100 years of heritage and advanced technical capabilities.

PF (Phase Fresnel) Lens Elements

The PF (Phase Fresnel) lens, developed by Nikon, effectively compensates chromatic aberration utilising the photo diffraction phenomenon*. It provides superior chromatic aberration compensation performance when combined with a normal glass lens. Compared to many general camera lenses that employ an optical system using the photorefractive phenomenon, a remarkably compact and lightweight body can be attained with less number of lens elements.

*Diffraction phenomenon: Light has characteristics as a waveform. When a waveform faces an obstacle, it attempts to go around and behind it, and this characteristic is referred to as diffraction. Diffraction causes chromatic dispersion in the reverse order of refraction.